Raising UP Emily’s What’s After Acceptance Narrative

dohnut_4

enjoythaimovies.com

Story #32

Em Thao is a 26 year old, identify as a Lesbian, and resides in California.

I knew I was gay when I was in the sixth grade chasing after this beautiful blonde named Georgia. Liking her was so normal to me because I wasn’t aware of what being gay and being straight was. I just knew that my heart goes spaghetti for her. I grew up thinking that I might just be bisexual which means I can I still marry a man and make my mom happy. After a few failed relationships with men, I concluded that I am definitely a lesbian. And that is how I knew.

I came out bisexual first to my friends, then my cousins and finally my brothers in high school. Everyone was very supportive, it was weird for my older cousins at first, but that dissipated quickly. My brothers never judged me, they could careless if I am gay or straight. I love them so much for that. It is because of this group of supportive people, I decided to come out to my mom at age 25. She always knew that I was gay, but she never wanted to to confirm it so she never ask me about it. We joke about it a few times, but that was that. I admit that I coming out to my mom could have been better on my end. I was scared so the words literally just spilled out. She said a few things and ran to her room. After a few months of not talking to each other, she finally told me that she love me and that I didn’t chose to be this way. She was just afraid of what people might say or do to me. At the moment, I am completely open to everyone in my family and group of friends. Co-workers are still a sensitive subject. Through my experience, I found out that Hmong Americans are more acceptable to homosexuality whereas the more traditional ones still have a backward way of thinking.

Flower Hmong schoolchildren. Bac Ha, Vietnam

terragalleria.com

The issues of being Hmong LGBTQQI are marriage and children. How do you perform a ceremony with two women or two man? Who’s going to be the one to pay? What about children? We all know that Hmong parents are not very open minded when it comes to adoption, how will they treat their grandchildren? What will these children learn from their community? I am getting to that stage and I am afraid that I don’t know any of these answers.

I had a few Hmong LGBTQQI friends back when I was younger, but we lost touch over the years. It would be super awesome to have an organized group to just meet and greet with other Hmong LGBTQQI. We should let them know that they are not alone, there are people like them, especially the young ones.

If you’re compelled by Emily’s story, we invite you (if you identify as Hmong LGBTQQI) to contribute your narrative to our collection and documentation by taking this 5 minute survey: http://tinyurl.com/HmongLGBTQQIStories

©Linda Her and MidWest Solidarity Movement, 2011 – 2014. All rights reserved. Unauthorized distribution with the intent to sell, use and/or duplication of these images, audio, video, stories, blog posts, and materials on this blog without express and written permission from this blog’s authors and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links as stated by MidWest Solidarity Movement members may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Linda Her and MidWest Solidarity Movement with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Raising UP Wilson’s Revive and Thrive Narrative

lgbtrainbowflag

ph.news.yahoo.com

Story #31

Wilson is a 17 year old Gay Hmong American from California.

I was about 13 years old when I started acknowledging that there was a possibility that I liked men. I always hid it from everyone because in this community (Asian or not) the word gay is used in such bad connotation it made me feel like something was wrong with me. Of course, this made me super scared to say anything to anyone, but I kind of put the worries aside and just day dreamed all through the next couple of years.

Well, there certainly are phases. The very first phase I remember was the phase of denial. I felt fuzzy around handsome men, but I always told myself that I just respected them a lot, or that they were just an icon for me to follow. Then I acknowledged my sexuality and hated myself. Depression struck me for about 3-4 years and it even got so bad that I tried to kill myself. Now, I’m completely okay and open about my sexuality. I mean, people are always going to judge and make fun of it, but eventually, you’d just laugh along side with them because it doesn’t matter. None of the sexuality stuff really even matters because I personally rarely bother to think if the person sitting next to me is gay or straight. In fact, that is the least of my worries. It’s not as big of a deal as it was back in the 1970’s, not saying it’s not a problem still, just saying, don’t be afraid to say something to someone. Start with one person and then build up. You’d be surprised at how many people will support you. And sometimes even if they don’t support your sexuality, they are still friends with you. I happen to have two friends who say gay marriage is wrong, but they completely accept me with all of my “mistakes” and stuff.

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theinspirationroom.com

One of the biggest reasons I came out was because I felt like I was morally cheating myself from the love that everyone else was experiencing. I came out because I loved myself, and because I knew there was nothing wrong with me. I loved myself enough to stand up to it, and I’m glad I did. The relationships haven’t changed too much. If anything, it get’s funnier with the girls, but with the boys, they might distance themselves, but just give them time. They’ll get over it, or they’ll ask you if you like them.

I’m out to everyone except my dad because he is really religious. He probably would kick me out or something because he is the type of guy who doesn’t take crap from anything. Maybe when I’m old enough to support myself properly I’ll tell him, or maybe one day I’ll just come home with a boyfriend. I’m not sure how it’ll go down, but it’s all alright with me.

Hmong-Necklaces

ethnicjewelsmagazine.com

I think the social aspect of the Hmong people on this topic is a big problem. I’ve never seen a bashing, but I know at times there is a problem with homophobia and isolation. Another is general approval of the parents.

I have heard of a Hmong LGBTQ person from my cousin and one of my acquaintances, but there wasn’t too much information given to me other than them telling me it’s going to be weird at first, but it’ll get better.

I think it would be awesome if Hmong people were more supportive. I believe that a lot of Hmong people would like to believe they’d support it, but when it gets down to it, they would be very hesitant, and I don’t blame them. We are a fairly new race to this whole “being on the spotlight” thing in America and other events, and I think it’s going to take a while before anything supportive comes from the Hmong community. As to the LGBTQQI’s existence in the Hmong culture, I’m sure that a lot of people we know are gay or questioning, but the fear is just keeping them locked up.

If you’re compelled by Wilson’s story, we invite you (if you identify as Hmong LGBTQQI) to contribute your narrative to our collection and documentation by taking this 5 minute survey: http://tinyurl.com/HmongLGBTQQIStories

©Linda Her and MidWest Solidarity Movement, 2011 – 2014. All rights reserved. Unauthorized distribution with the intent to sell, use and/or duplication of these images, audio, video, stories, blog posts, and materials on this blog without express and written permission from this blog’s authors and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links as stated by MidWest Solidarity Movement members may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Linda Her and MidWest Solidarity Movement with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

Come Celebrate MINNEAPOLIS PRIDE with Us!

 

HAPPY PRIDE WEEK! Come Celebrate Minneapolis Pride with us and meet other Hmong LGBTQ people! We have awesome activities that you can have FUN and learn at the same time:

  1. History of PRIDE through multiple communities and their stories.
  2. What is PRIDE beyond the glitz and glam?
  3. Where do you, we belong in the history of PRIDE? Mapping and documenting our stories into Pride History.
  4. Learn & research about LGBTQA organizations in your area that provide services you need.
  5. March with us at the Trans and Dyke March!
  6. Soulfriday Dance Party.

*If you haven’t filled the Raising UP the Hmong LGBTQQI Narrative Survey, please do so here: http://tinyurl.com/HmongLGBTQQIStories

For more information about celebrating Minneapolis Pride with us, please contact us at: linda@mwsmovement.com or txoov@mwsmovement.com. Thank you!

May 19, 2012 – Day of Action with President Obama’s Grassroots Campaign

Greetings from the Margins!

It was such a beautiful day after the National API HIV/AIDS Awareness Day, that we decided to go volunteer and help door-knock for President Obama’s Grassroots Campaign.

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(Left to Right) Danny K., Dee L., & Chong V.

This was actually Danny K.’s first time out door-knocking, so the lovely Dee L. had the pleasure to train in Danny K. on how to effectively door-knock; and how to make an ask for voters to commit to vote for President Obama on Election Day, November 6, 2012.

Although it was quite hot and humid on that day, we came across a block (across from Central High) that was polluted with garbage from the neighbors. While canvassing, we came across an unused trash bag and decided that we cannot only canvass today, but we needed to be proactive in being GREEN as well. So, we decided to pick up trash and pollutants around the area where we canvassed.

Not only will we leave an impression that we are committed to making change on a national level, but we are also very committed to making sustaining change on a local level as well.

Saturday, May 19, 2012 – National API HIV/AIDS Awareness Day

Greetings from the Margins! On Saturday, May 19, 2012, MWSM was invited to come speak at the National API HIV/AIDS Awareness Day event at Neighborhood House in South St. Paul, MN. MWSM’s collective member, Chong V., took on the role of speaking about his experiences as a Gay Asian American male with experiences of STDs and HIV/AIDS in the Gay and Bisexual MSM (Men Who Have Sex with Men) community.

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(Left to Right) Dee L., Danny K., & Chong V.

Chong gave such a heartfelt story highlighting his experiences of being a Model Minority discovering his sexuality, and how the two identities clashed with one another leading to his experiences of STDs and HIV/AIDS in the MSM community.

Furthermore, we were excited to see young participants coming in and wanting to learn more about how to prevent the increase of HIV/AIDS in their own communities; and getting tested to educate themselves on their HIV status. Hopefully, the National API HIV/AIDS Awareness Day is not just an event designated to one day, but a routine every API individual will incorporate into their daily lives.

Save the Date May 2, 2012: 3rd & Final Txuj Ci Showcase

A Night of Local Queer Asian American & Ally Artists
Unlimited Edition
Wed, May 2, 6:00-9:00 PM
Coffman Union Whole Music Club

Txuj Ci Showcase was originally a night where Hmong LGBTQ and their allies came together to showcase their talents and to build community and space together.

This year, we have intentionally open it up to the Asian American LGBTQ and their allies for a more inclusive community. Meanwhile still being able to include the Hmong LGBTQ community, hence it is the UNLIMITED EDITION.

The first Txuj Ci Showcase in 2010 included over 120 participants and we grew to 175 participants at the 2nd Annual Showcase in 2011. This year, as we plan for our 3rd and final Txuj Ci Showcase at the University of Minnesota, we hope to see an even bigger crowd of participants and performers. Previous performances include singers, traditional Hmong dancers, modern dancers, drag singers, Qeej instrument performances, fashion designers and show, as well as spoken word artists and visual artists.

We are excited to host another Txuj Ci Showcase and look forward to seeing fresh talents and fresh faces this year! Please join us for a night of amazing art, performances, and delicious food! This is a collaborative effort between the GLBTA Programs Office and Midwest Solidarity Movement and cosponsorship from the Asian Sorority Interest Group. For more information, please contact glbtapo@umn.edu.

Performances, Live Art, Visual Pieces and Fashion Show By:
Chann
Kevin Thao
Ka Lia Yang
Tou Saiko Lee
Hmong Her
Brenda Kothsombath
Sina Yi
Dee Lee
Shay Hicks and Tivon Yang
Rebecca “Rebel” Song
Ongers Her
Ashaley Yang
MidWest Solidarity Movement

MCs:
Fue Khang and Kong Pha
Mdy Yang and Linda Hawj

Photographer:
Maysa Vang
Check out our websites to see what we’re up to as well!
http://www.glbta.umn.edu/
https://mwsmovement.com/
https://sites.google.com/site/asigumn/

We’re on facebook: http://on.fb.me/txujci